1/18/22

Thoughts and Impressions of Motiv Powered Vehicles


                                       Thoughts and Impressions of Motiv Powered Vehicles

1/15/22

The Future is Now: Upcoming Hybrid and Electric Trucks and Vans - Canoo



Canoo’s electric pickup truck has a flatbed size comparable to a traditional pickup truck, making it easy to maneuver and convenient to drive. The vehicle features accessories that accommodate on-site jobs, including a pull-out bed extension, fold down work table and cargo storage, flip down side tables, side step and storage, modular bed with space dividers, and multi-accessory charge port.

Specifications include dual or rear motor configurations, up to 600 hp and 550 lb.-ft. of torque with dual motors; vehicle payload capacity of 1800 pounds; and 200+ miles of battery range. The overall dimensions are 184 inches long (213 inches with the bed extension), 78 inches wide (87 inches with mirrors), and 76 inches high (82 inches with the roof rack). The bed is 64 inches by 72 inches, and 64 inches by 102 inches with the extension. The production version of the pickup truck is now open for pre-orders, with deliveries beginning as early as 2023.

Source: https://www.automotive-fleet.com/10144157/the-future-is-now-upcoming-hybrid-and-electric-trucks-and-vans?utm_source=website&utm_medium=contentoffers&utm_campaign=011122

1/14/22

Ford F-600 offers medium-duty benefits in smaller frame


According to Ford Motor Co., fleet and commercial customers can now manage larger upfits, carry more equipment and tow heavier loads with the Model Year 2021 Ford F-600 than they can with any other Super Duty chassis cab its size. Customers will also get the added capability of standard power takeoff provision on both the class-exclusive gasoline and available diesel powertrains.

Slotted between F-550 Super Duty and F-650 Pro Loader Medium Duty truck, F-600 has the familiar size, interior and controls of an F-550, with a step-up height that’s only 3 millimeters higher. F-600 uses higher-capacity wheels and tires, upgraded driveshaft mounts, an upgraded rear axle, more robust brake rotor materials and strategically placed frame reinforcements behind the cab to deliver Class 6 capability in a compact Class 5 package.

With the available 6.7-liter V8 Power Stroke diesel engine, F-600 delivers gooseneck towing capacity of 34,500 pounds and a maximum GCWR of 43,000 pounds. The third-generation diesel features enormous low-rpm output to get truly heavy loads underway, with 330 hp and 825 lb.-ft. of maximum torque at 2,000 rpm. As a result, customers can equip their F-600 with heavier bodies and equipment like telescopic cranes, and can tow larger loads so nothing has to get left behind.

“For years, many of our utility, towing and oil/gas service fleet customers have specced all the possible upgrades on their F-550 chassis cabs to avoid having to step up to a traditional Class 6 truck, but they’ve still pushed the limits of what a Class 5 truck can do,” said Nathan Oscarson, Ford commercial truck brand manager. “Now those fleets are moving into F-600 to get the increased payload and GCWR they’ve needed all along in a truck that fits.”

As F-600 enters its second year of production, the Ford TorqShift 10-speed automatic transmission comes with a 10-bolt design live drive power takeoff (PTO) provision standard on both the 7.3-liter V8 gasoline and 6.7-liter V8 diesel powertrains. The power takeoff provision works with aftermarket power takeoff units to drive auxiliary equipment anytime the engine is running, either in stationary or mobile mode at any vehicle speed. In stationary mode, it is rated to handle up to 300 lb.-ft. of torque. F-600 equipped with the diesel engine offers split-shaft PTO capability that makes it possible to run two pieces of auxiliary equipment at the same time when the vehicle is stopped.

Learn more at: https://www.fleetowner.com/resource-center/hd-pickup-van/press-release/21150784/2021-ford-f600-offers-medium-duty-benefits-in-smaller-frame?utm_source=FR+FO+Heavy+Duty+Pickup+%26+Van&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=CPS201218025&o_eid=1481J5028834F5F&rdx.ident%5Bpull%5D=omeda%7C1481J5028834F5F&oly_enc_id=1481J5028834F5F


1/11/22

Venco Venturo Industries, LLC Electric-Hydraulic Cranes - Work Truck Show


ET6K ELECTRIC-HYDRAULIC CRANE Max. Capacity 2,000 lb - Crane Rating 6,000 ft-lb - Max. Reach 10 ft Min. Truck Size Needed (GVWR) Class 2 (8,000 lb) The Venturo ET6K service crane is a 6,000 ft.-lbs. crane with 2,000 lb. lifting capacity featuring electric winch, power rotation and hydraulic boom elevation with a single, manual extension up to 10 ft. ET12KXP ELECTRIC-HYDRAULIC CRANE Max. Capacity 3,500 lb, Crane Rating 12,000 ft-lb, Max. Reach 16 ft Min. Truck Size Needed (GVWR) Class 2 (8,800 lbs GVWR) With a 12,000 FT-LB rating and a 3,500 LB maximum capacity, the ET12KXP can be installed on trucks with a minimum Class 2 (8,800 lbs GVWR). The ET12KXP features proportional control, single-stage full-hydraulic extension and a one-piece hexagonal boom for increased strength. This new crane features a 9′ – 16′ reach. ET12K(X) ELECTRIC-HYDRAULIC CRANE Max. Capacity 3,500 lb - Crane Rating 12,000 ft-lb - Max. Reach 15 ft Min. Truck Size Needed (GVWR) Class 2 (8,800 lb) The Venturo ET12KX service crane is a versatile application that is neither too large or too small for a majority of lifting jobs. This crane has been utilized heavily in municipal/public works industry lifting anything from service equipment to fire hydrants throughout the United States. With a 12,000 FT-LB rating and a 3,500 LB maximum capacity, the ET12KX can be installed on trucks with a minimum 8,800 GVWR. The ET12K(X) comes in two configurations; the ET12K offers two-stage manual boom extension, and the ET12KX offers single-stage hydraulic extension with a secondary manual boom extension.

1/09/22

Commercial Van Equipment & Upfits by Ranger Design


Video demonstrating commercial van equipment manufactured by Ranger Design: See our website for more info http://rangerdesign.com/ - Tradesman Packages - Van Tool Drawers - Axess Tray Cargo Slides - Van Ladder Racks - Revolutionary Max Rack Drop Down Ladder Rack - Van Partitions: Crash Tested for Your Maximum Safety - Contoured Van Bulkheads for Maximum Cabin Comfort - Van Bin Storage Units - Partskeepers Storage Units - Van Shelving - "Fold-Away" Foldable Van Shelving - Sliding Door Van Safety Partition Visit our website http://rangerdesign.com/ or call our friendly staff at 1-800-565-5321 for your next upfit.

1/07/22

Premier Work Truck Bodies – BIG and Small



Big or Small – We Build Them All!  

Steel or Aluminum, Flatbeds, Dumps, Standard or Custom. If you have a need for a work truck body, we can build it for any* chassis, Pickup Bed Removal / Replacement, 1 Ton, Medium Duty and up to a Heavy-Duty Chassis.

Premier Truck Center works with customers to design and build bodies that will work for them. Many times it will be a standard body with a few options, Other times it might be a complete custom body for a specific application.

Often, we find that a contractor has ideas for a body that will make their job easier and more efficient. They may have been thinking about it for many years but have been unable to find exactly what they want.

Visit our website at: premiertruckbodies.com

We want to hear from you. Contact us by phone or email, we are here to listen.

Premier Truck Center
1313 17th Street East
Palmetto, FL 34221

Phone: 941-729-8196



*Chassis must be qualified for the specific body being mounted.

1/06/22

Highway Products | Truckslide™ XT-2000 It's How We Build It


Truckslide™ XT-2000
Built for rugged work conditions
• 2,000 pound capacity
• 1/8” fully formed aluminum tray – no welds or weak points
• Two 10 Gauge galvanized Steel Tracks
• ¼” Steel pull handle and safety locking plungers
• Eight 2” Chrome Steel Sealed Bearings

It’s How We Build it
1. 1/8” 5052 Fully Formed Aluminum Tray
2. Two 10 ga. Galvanized Steel Tracks
3. ¼” Thick Pull Handle & Safety Plungers
4. Polished Chrome Steel Bearings

1/8” 5052 Fully Formed Aluminum Tray
1. No welds, no weak points, built to take a beating
2. Will never rust or deteriorate due to weather
3. 49” tray width for pallets & 4x8 sheets
4. 5” tall side rails with tie-down points

Two 10 ga. Galvanized Steel Tracks
1. Over-built & over-engineered for maximum weight capacity
2. Galvanized steel will never rust or deteriorate in the weather
3. Safety locking points built-in tracks
4. Tray rails glide down tracks that are secured by oversized mounting brackets

¼” Thick Pull Handle & Safety Plungers
1. Pull handle actuates rocker mechanism
2. Rocker made from 10 ga. galvanized steel that is cased in 5052 control box
3. ½” 302 stainless springs slam shut plungers into track safety locking points
4. Plungers are made from ¼” steel flat bar

Eight Chrome Steel Bearings
1. Each track contains four 2” sealed, vertically positioned, radial bearings
2. Each track also contains two .875 inch sealed, laterally positioned, radial bearings
3. Each 2” bearing has a dynamic load capacity of 3,600 lbs
4. Bearings are self-lubricated and sealed to protect from dust and contamination

1/04/22

Cargo Space, Delivery Time, Product Damage, Fuel Waste, Equipment Loss and Worker Injury = $$$ MONEY $$$!


Made in America, HTS Systems' safety and productivity commercial delivery vehicle equipment delivers fast; literally! Did you know that a commercial hand truck can take-up to 12'-15' cubic feet of valuable cargo space in cargo vans? During a five day work week, that translates to a payload loss of more than 240'-300' cubic feet of payload area per month!

Danaken Designs of Scranton, Pennsylvania is a complete corrugated packaging and display manufacturer. From concept to design, they do it all! Last week Danaken Designs manufactured hundreds of our new HTS-20SHM-2 and HTS-20SHM-1 corrugated shipping boxes for our commercial delivery van market. These new boxes ship worldwide and failure isn't an option! That's why we trust Ken Jenkins, he's NEVER let us down! Our new cutting dies tested perfectly last week and the new print plate arrived last week. Danaken Designs supplies all of our HTS Systems' shipping boxes. Danaken Designs supplies many large Fortune 500 corporations and smaller businesses with customized corrugated shipping containers. Products that need to get there undamaged, handled ergonomically and look great when they arrive need the Danaken Design specialists. Protective inserts, printed art graphics, easy-fast packaging, parcel-freight approved and highly competitive pricing is just a small part of what Danaken Design can offer your company; over 35 years of experience!

Every month large companies will spend millions of dollars marketing their products, advertising and protecting their brand's positioning, identity and reputation. Just one accident resulting in a serious injury or death because of negligence can damage the reputation and inadvertently change the confidence and opinion of the buyer towards the brand name. This consumer perception may take years to overcome, even if the company is later found not negligent or liable for a highway accident! Adverse media exposure that focuses on a brand name vehicle can have dire consequences. Any driver who rushes back (off-route) in a hurry to retrieve their forgotten hand truck is no longer a safe driver, they instantly become a liability! What other investment could you possibly make in your company and truck fleet that will give you that large of a return and that type of protection?

The HTS is a hand truck safety rack that's safer, faster, easier, a one-handed method; a patented solution that pays for itself over and over again! The ancient hand truck carrier racks of the past eventually fail and it usually occurs when the delivery truck is traveling. Often these types of failures result in catastrophic highway accidents, severe injuries and costly lawsuits and legal settlements. Contact your van equipment provider for more information about our very popular cargo van safety and productivity equipment.

Learn more at: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/cargo-space-delivery-time-product-damage-worker-injury-boettcher/






1/01/22

10 Things Everyone Should Know About Tires

 By Eric Peters, Automotive Columnist

You probably know tires are made of rubber — but how much more do you know? Here’s a run-through of some important tire-related terminology:

1) Aspect ratio

This technical-sounding term refers to the relationship between the width of a tire and the height of the tire’s sidewall. High-performance “low profile” tires have “low aspect ratios” — meaning their sidewalls are short relative to their width. This provides extra stiffness and thus better high-speed handling and grip — but also tends to result in a firmer (and sometimes, harsh) ride. “Taller” tires tend to provide a smoother ride and better traction in snow.

2) Contact Patch

As your tires rotate, only a portion of the total tread is actually in contact with the ground at any given moment.  This is known as the contact patch.  Think of it as your tire’s “footprint.” Sport/performance-type tires are characterized by their wider footprint — more tread is in contact with the ground — which provides extra grip, especially during hard acceleration on dry pavement and during high-speed cornering.

3) Treadwear indicators

These are narrow bands built into the tread during manufacturing that begin to show when only 1/16 of the tire’s tread remains. Also called wear bars, treadwear indicators are there to provide an obvious visual warning that it’s time to shop for new tires.

4) Speed ratings

An alpha-numeric symbol you’ll find on your tire’s sidewall that tells you the maximum sustained speed the tire is capable of safely handling. An H-rated tire, for example, is built to be safe for continuous operation at speeds up to 130 mph. Most current model year family-type cars have S (112 mph) or T (118 mph) speed ratings. High performance cars often have tires with a V (149 mph) or  ZR (in excess of 149 mph) speed rating. A few ultra-performance cars have W (168 mph) and even Y (186 mph) speed-rated tires.

5) Maximum cold inflation load limit

This refers to the maximum load that can be carried in a given vehicle with a given type of tires — and the maximum air pressure needed to support that load. In your vehicle’s owner’s manual, you should be able to find the recommended cold inflation load limit. It’s important not to exceed the load limit (or over or under-inflate the tires) as this can lead to stability/handling problems and even tire failure. Always check tire pressure “cold.” Driving creates friction which creates heat; as the tires warm up, the air inside expands, increasing the pressure. Measuring air pressure after driving can give a false reading; you may actually be driving around on under-inflated tires.

6) Load index

This number corresponds to the load carrying capacity of the tire. The higher the number, the higher the load it can safely handle. As an example, a tire with a load index of 89 can safely handle 1,279 pounds — while a tire with a load rating of 100 can safely handle as much as 1,764 pounds. It’s important to stick with tires that have at least the same load rating as the tires that came originally with the vehicle — especially if it’s a truck used to haul heavy loads or pull a trailer. It’s ok to go with a tire that has a higher load rating than the original tires; just be careful to avoid tires with a lower load rating than specified for your vehicle, even if they are less expensive. Saving a few bucks on tires is not worth risking an accident caused by tire failure.

7) Radial vs. bias-ply tire

Bias-ply tires have their underlying plies laid at alternate angles less than 90 degrees to the centerline of the tread; radials have their plies laid at 90 degrees to the centerline of the tread. That’s the technical difference. The reason radial tires are dominant today is that they help improve fuel efficiency and handling; they also tend to dissipate heat better than bias-ply tires. No modern passenger cars come with bias-ply tires these days and their use is generally not recommended. (Exceptions might include older/antique vehicles that originally came equipped with bias-ply tires. Some RVs also used bias-ply tires, etc.) It is very important never to mix radial and bias-ply tires; dangerously erratic handling may result.

8) LT and MS tires

These designations indicate “Light Truck” and “Mud/Snow” — and are commonly found on tires fitted to SUVs and pick-ups. LT-rated tires are more general purpose, built primarily for on-road use — while MS-rated tires typically have more aggressive “knobby” tread patterns designed for better off-road traction.

9) Temporary Use Only

Many modern cars come with so-called “space-saver” tires which are smaller and lighter than a standard or full-size spare tire. They are designed to leave more room in the trunk and be easier for the average person to handle when a roadside tire change becomes necessary. However, they are not designed to be used for extended (or high-speed) driving. Your car will probably not handle (or stop) as well while the Space Saver tire is on – and you should keep your speed under 55 mph and avoid driving on the tire beyond what’s absolutely necessary to find a tire repair shop where you can have your damaged tire repaired or replaced.

10) Treadwear, Traction and Temperature ratings

Each tire has three separate ratings for Treadwear, Traction and Temperature.

Traction ratings run from AA to A to B and C — with C being the lowest on the scale. The ratings represent the tire’s ability to stop on wet pavement under controlled testing conducted by the government. C-rated tires are marginal and should be avoided. Never buy a tire with a Traction rating that isn’t at least equal to the minimum rating specified by the manufacturer of your vehicle.

Temperature ratings from A to B to C — with C being the minimum allowable for any passenger car tire. The ratings correspond to a given tire’s ability to dissipate heat under load; tires with lower ratings are more prone to heat-induced failure, especially if driven at high speeds (or when overloaded). As with Traction ratings, never buy a tire with a Temperature rating that’s less than specified for your vehicle.

Treadwear ratings differ from Traction and Temperature ratings in that they aren’t a measure of a tire’s built-in safety margin. Instead, these ratings — represented by a three digit number — give you an idea of the expected useful life of the tire according to government testing. A tire with a Treadwear rating of 150, for example, can be expected to last about 1.5 times as long as a tire with a Treadwear rating of 100. These are just guides, however. Your tires may last longer (or not) depending on such factors as how you drive, whether you maintain proper inflation pressure and rotate the tires per recommendations — and so on.

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